Closet Christians? Come Out with Full Conviction!

There’s a church located in one of the largest cities in the country, both in terms of geographic size and population.  A coastal area with beautiful, sandy beaches and a treasure trove of history close-by, there are those who consider it “chic” and “hip,” a rather cosmopolitan city, even with its small-town roots and flavor.  Some say it’s a special place, with its strategic seaport and major highway to other places that runs right through it.

Chicago on the banks of Lake Michigan?  Portland, Maine?  Jacksonville, Miami, or Ft. Lauderdale, Florida?  Long Island, New York?

Thessalonia-MapNo, not quite.  But we can find quite a few parallels between these American cities and Thessalonia, one of the few New Testament cities that still is around today … as well as between the church at Thessalonia and some of our churches here and now.

Each are worthy of praise and thanksgiving to God.  That’s exactly what Paul was doing – celebrating the church – in his epistles to the people at the church of Thessalonia.

And there are other parallels worth noting, too, between the places where we live and Thessalonia.

Comparable to many U.S. cities and suburbs, it had a mixture of wealthy people, a small middle class, and then a large majority of poor people like us: slaves to the system that surrounds us.

There was tension and turmoil in Thessalonia.  Rampant crime.  Graffiti, obscene and objectionable words and images could be found on the walls of buildings.  Murder was commonplace and divorce frequent.  And, depending on whose standards were the measuring stick, morality, at best, was questionable.

Sound familiar?

Uh-huh: Very much like where we live!

Yet in the self-serving sea of crime-ridden culture was the Thessalonian church, a little island to the glory of God.

I like to think the same can be said about some of our churches.  No doubt it pleases God that diverse bodies of Christ come together to worship, pray, and praise the glory of our loving Creator. 

Another profound parallel for me … perhaps the most critical and striking one in terms of similarities, is that the Thessalonian church was a new and different kind of church, made up of new and different people

Thessalonia-New and Gay ChurchesJust as Thessalonia was the first church whose congregation essentially comprised non-Jewish people, many of our open, progressive, inclusive, and affirming churches among the first churches in their neighborhoods ministering to LGBT people and their fair-minded, open-hearted allies.

What makes our churches and that one in Thessalonia so special? Let’s take a quick look and discern what we can from I Thessalonians 1:1-10:

During his second missionary journey, after picking up Timothy along the way, the Apostle Paul arrived with Silas in Thessalonia in 48 or 49 AD.  They left about a year later. In the midst of trials and tribulations, persecution and hostility, Paul writes his letters to this church which he’s obviously very fond of, while still living in Corinth.

(Much of the history of the Apostle Paul’s missionary trip to Thessalonia is found in Acts 17.)

In I Thessalonians, Paul launches into what might be the longest section of thanksgiving found anywhere in the entire New Testament.  He is absolutely pumped about the church in Thessalonia. Although he is obviously quite pleased with this church, there’s another reason I suspect that he spends so much time expressing his thanks: the members of this church lack confidence in their personal salvation.

Thessalonia-Salvation InsecuritiesFor me, that’s another parallel between the Thessalonian church and today’s churches that minister to LGBT people.  As a pastor who’s listened to the doubts and concerns of more than a few of you, I know there’s still some hesitation, a lingering doubt, about whether God really does love and accept you “despite” your sexual orientation … just as you are.

With all my heart, I believe that God does!

For his part, the Apostle Paul spends time affirming those in the church of Thessalonia. 

In verses 2-3 here he writes, “We give thanks to God always for all of you, making mention of you in our prayers, constantly bearing in mind the work of faith and labor of love and steadfastness of hope in our Lord Jesus Christ in the presence of our God and Father.”

Don’t you just love it?  I don’t know about you, but three little words – faith, hope, and love – literally jumped right out at me, recalling that beautiful passage so many people are fond of from I Corinthians 13: “And now these three remain: faith, hope and love.  But the greatest of these is love.”

Despite their differences – they’re mostly Gentiles rather than Jews – Paul is confident that the Thessalonians are loved and accepted by God, just as I am equally confident that the same can be said of you, my LGBT brothers and sisters in Christ. 

Like the church at Thessalonia, our own churches still aren’t really typical of many churches today.  Nevertheless, I believe that these churches represent God’s ideal—the type of church God wants every church to become: wonderful places to be!

The Thessalonians became a living example to other believers, we’re told in verse 7.  In other words, it’s not enough to just live our lives among other welcoming, inclusive, and affirming Christians … in isolation.  Sometimes, we’re called to be more direct in using and channeling our influence with others.

For most people to believe in God, or to believe in God anew — especially people within the LGBT community — the personal touch is needed.  That means we need to be forthcoming about what we believe, sharing our faith with full conviction that we are truly loved by God and that our God is worthy of all praise!

Too many LGBT people have turned away — or been turned away — from church and, in the process, find themselves turned off to the God that created them and continues to love them unconditionally.

Hurt, bigotry, judgmentalism, condemnation and rejection from much of the religious establishment indeed are what brought many of us to new and different kinds of churches focused on love.

It’s up to us now to be goodwill ambassadors of Christ from churches like ours … to share the good news, sensitively and sensibly, with our brothers and sisters.

After all, isn’t that what affirming our “Pride” is really all about?

Thessalonia-Another-Christian-Who-Happens-to-be-Gay-Rainbow-Pride-CrossIt’s not enough to be “closet Christians” who come to church and worship for an hour or so among ourselves on Sundays.  We’re expected to tell others the gospel truth about God’s love for them … inviting them to experience this amazing grace and spiritual connection for themselves.

And, yes, it is difficult to talk to others about something so sensitive and personal as religion. 

That much we share with our straight friends in churches across the spectrum. 

It’s much easier to hand someone a brochure, point them to a Website, or ask the pastor to intercede by conducting a cold call.

For us, especially – for you and for me – it’s even harder to talk about the God we believe loves us … much less admit that we do go to church.  It’s not unlike coming out of the closet again … something many of us already did in terms of our sexuality and now are being pressed to do about our spirituality.

Still, we’re called to speak with full conviction, aware that God has given us a very special mission field to which few are called and even fewer choose to go.

People saw a change in those who worshiped at Thessalonia.  They had become better people – more loving, compassionate, giving, and thankful – because of their faith and their beliefs. 

We all know what happens when people are branded as being different: they’re talked about … and lots of people talked up the church at Thessalonia, telling others about the amazing things that were happening there. 

Thessalonia-Your Faith Is Known EverywhereThe history of the Thessalonian church is a story about what can happen when everything goes right, the way God wants it to be: Paul and his team quickly planted a vibrant and healthy church that reached out to others, touching and turning many lives around for the better.

My own hope is that we can be churches like the one at Thessalonia, places people want to be … because God is here among us, helping and healing and loving and blessing and making us a community of believers to praise.

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Eunuchs

4For thus says the LORD,
“To the eunuchs who keep My sabbaths,
And choose what pleases Me,
And hold fast My covenant,

5To them I will give in My house and within My walls a memorial,
And a name better than that of sons and daughters;
I will give them an everlasting name which will not be cut off.
“–Isaiah 56:4-5

Imagine if you were a special “type” of person … someone who belonged to what might be called a “sexual minority” … a person who would be conveniently used by others when your special gifts and talented were needed … yet, although you were good-natured, attractive, talented and trustworthy, you had absolutely no rights or legal standing whatsoever.

Not too hard to imagine, huh?

Well, that’s exactly the predicament faced by a group of people known as “eunuchs” in the Bible.

Image

Rembrandt’s Baptism of the Eunuch

Eunuch. 

Even the name, itself, sounds strange.  Be that as it may, some scholars say there upwards of 40 Old Testament verses containing a word – in Hebrew, Greek or Aramaic – used to mean “eunuch” … while, in at least two New Testament passages, eunuchs are at the heart of the message.

So, what, exactly is a eunuch?

Simple: A eunuch is someone who has no physical attraction to people of the opposite sex.  Back in the Bible, eunuchs didn’t have sex with women and they didn’t have children.  Since they had no children, they had no vested interest in leaving a fortune to the next generation.  Therefore, they had no reason to be crooked or seek advantage for their own offspring.

Some people were just born that way.  Others were made that way surgically in order to serve their masters.  Still others chose to deny themselves and be celibate in order to focus entirely on God.

Translated to English, eunuch essentially means “keeper of the bed chamber” or “overseer of the household.” 

Put another way, a eunuch was an “emasculated man.”  Many historians believe that eunuchs were homosexuals.

In other words, people living thousands of years ago all across Europe and Asia acknowledged a certain category of men as different from the norm.  Their difference consisted in the fact that they had no sex drive toward women and that difference was conceived of as natural and inborn.  We know, too, of ancient cultures where there were women who, by nature, had no lust for men. 

Does the island of “Lesbos” ring a bell?

The ancient Hebrews didn’t practice castration. The Law excluded eunuchs from public worship, partly because self-mutilation was often performed in honor of a heathen god, and partly because any maimed creature was deemed unfit for the service of Yahweh.  That ban, however, was later removed.  The kings of Israel and Judah often followed their royal neighbors in employing eunuchs as guardian of the harem and other official posts. 

Apart from castration, eunuchs were naturally incapacitated, either for marriage or for begetting children.

Eunuchs were common in other cultures featured in theImage Bible.  Remember Potiphar, who managed the household of a high-ranking official in Pharaoh’s court?  He was a eunuch.  Maybe that explains why the official’s wife made a play, instead, for Joseph, he of the coat of many colors.  Joseph tried to escape and left the woman holding his garment (but that, my friends, is another story).

Eunuchs were trusted around the women who were married since they weren’t a threat in committing adultery with another man’s wife or engaging in pre-marital sex with a household of women. 

In fact, eunuchs were exalted to such positions that they watched over the harems of the kings they served.  Both boys and girls were sold into slavery as eunuchs by their parents to give their child a better life or to provide for the rest of the family.

Eunuchs could be extremely beautiful and attractive.  Some say that Daniel – along with his friends Shadrach, Meschach, and Abednego  — were virile and handsome men who were castrated before being banished into captivity by the Babylonians and sent to serve Nebuchadnezzar.  First century historian Josephus asserts that Daniel and his three friends were made eunuchs.  Even before that, the writer of 2 Kings 20:18 predicts, “And some of your descendants, your own flesh and blood that will be born to you, will be taken away and they will become eunuchs in the palace of the king of Babylon.”

While in exile, Queen Esther – the wife of Persian King Xerxes – had a eunuch assigned to serve her personal needs, showing that in this time period it was common for such women to be attended by “men who didn’t pose a sexual threat.”  According to the Book of Esther (1:10), the king had seven eunuchs who served him.

The New Testament also refers to eunuchs.  Candace, Queen of the Ethiopians, sent one of her eunuchs to Jerusalem to worship Yahweh, God of the Hebrews.  As the eunuch was drawing close to Jerusalem, the Apostle Phillip, one of the leaders in the early New Testament church, was sent by God to explain and preach the gospel to him. 

But I’m getting a bit ahead of myself here.  (You can read the entire story yourself in Acts 8:26-31.)

Ironically, some could say that the Apostle Paul was a eunuch in that he remained single and celibate to fully concentrate on his mission for Christ.

What’s really important here is the idea that even a eunuch could be baptized, draw close to God, and become part of God’s family. 

I believe this reaffirms the impartiality of God. 

“Whosoever believes,” says the Scripture … and that includes eunuchs.

Which brings us to what Jesus has to say about these extraordinary people.  Let’s take a look at Matthew 19:8-12, where Jesus and his disciples are discussing marriage and divorce, and the conditions under which it is permissible to divorce:

8Jesus replied, “Moses permitted you to divorce your wives because your hearts were hard. But it was not this way from the beginning. 9I tell you that anyone who divorces his wife, except for marital unfaithfulness, and marries another woman commits adultery.” 10The disciples said to him, “If this is the situation between a husband and wife, it is better not to marry.” 11Jesus replied, “Not everyone can accept this word, but only those to whom it has been given. 12For some are eunuchs because they were born that way; others were made that way by men; and others have renounced marriagec because of the kingdom of heaven. The one who can accept this should accept it.”

In this context, Jesus is saying that some people aren’t suitable for marriage.  His reasons are lumped together under the category of being a eunuch. 

The Lord himself expanded the meaning of eunuch to include those who are unmarried for a variety of reasons.  Some are made this way by others.  Some are born this way.  They are unable to get married because they have no natural inclination to have sexual relations with a mate of the opposite sex.

It is highly unlikely that Jesus is referring to a straight, but impotent, male … or a castrated one, for that matter … when he talks about eunuchs. 

Why? Because castrated and impotent men still can be attracted to women. 

A eunuch is a man who can’t reproduce, not necessarily a man who isn’t sexual.  Some men were castrated specifically so they could stay young and pretty and be sexual with other men.

We’ve all heard the joke about the pamphlet entitled, “What Jesus Said about Homosexuality.”  Open it up and it’s blank.  Of course, that’s true.  Jesus never mentioned homosexuality, per se. 

But as knowing and wise as Jesus was – or, as the fundamentalists like to say, “Jesus Christ is the same yesterday, today and forever” (Hebrews 13:8) – wouldn’t you think that He’d know there would one day be a terrible problem in his church, in Christianity, and in culture over homosexuality, gay rights, and same-sex marriage?  Then, why didn’t he say anything specific?

I believe he did: 

Jesus said, “Let the one who can accept this accept it.” 

Not everyone can accept this. 

So, I have to wonder: Is Jesus talking to us, preaching to the choir?  Or is he talking about others in his church who need to understand and accept what he’s saying here about eunuchs … about those of us who don’t conform to society’s norms about gender?

Eunuchs were foreigners to God’s temple when Isaiah made his prophecy, due to one of those damning Deuteronomy verses (23:1): “No one who has been emasculated by crushing or cutting may enter the assembly of the Lord.” 

But Isaiah here states that God Almighty will wipe away the bonds of the Mosaic Law through his love, mercy, and grace.

It is, therefore, very clear that eunuchs not only have a place in heaven, but are given “a name better than sons and daughters.”

Can it get any better than that?